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Knowing what questions to ask, is where Tingle Consulting Ltd offers extensive expertise, developed over the years. 

This expertise developed within key support roles within all sections of a Local Authority, Collective national mutual support groups such as the Society of Chief Offices of Transportation in Scotland (SCOTS), National advisory groups such as Flood Issues Advisory Committee (FIAC), Flood Bill Advisory Group (FBAG), Scottish Advisory and Implementation Forum for Flooding (SAIFF), Regional pilots such as Glasgow Clyde Valley Green Network (GCV GN) Exemplar SuDS project, National SuDs Working Party (SuDSWP), International Interreg NWE Urban Water Project, UK UID pilots, and SuDSnet.

Perhaps the best place to start with the questions would be to refer to Renfrewshire Council's Scrutiny and Petitions Board report on Flooding in Renfrewshire.  This report highlights the reactive actions raised after a significant storm event larger than the devastating December 1994 storm event.  Whilst the measures put in place between 1994 and Dec 13 2006 mitigated the effects, the requirements for joined up thinking are clearly evident as are some of the measures required, some of which still await implementation.


How important is overland surface water flow mapping?

What is Modular Surface Water Management?

What are Drainage Assessment Guidelines?

What does the Lowest Overall Public Cost actually mean?

Why is water "first amongst equals" in respect of development considerations?

How might a Local Area Committee (LAC) influence public engagement, and scrutinise responsible authorities' proposed measures within any Local Flood Risk Management Plan.



How important is overland surface water flow mapping?

Extremely important, as such mapping effectively shows in outline just where any symptons of flooding would most likely occur if the risk of general flooding was high enough. However, it's when we look into the source of flooding issues and their mitigation, that overland surface water flow mapping really becomes crucial to any integrated and sustainable management approach.

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What is Modular Surface Water Management?

Surface water management aspires to manage the surplus surface water from all sources, but essentially only utilises the bodies responsible for dealing with the symptoms of surplus surface water, such as pollution of uncontrolled flooding. The modular approach is to extend the number of bodies involved, to target the sources of surplus surface water whenever possible. The provision of sufficient information in an understandable format to the architect involved in development layout options at the concept stage, would be a modular approach. The involvement of various asset management regimes where opportunity exists for integrated working, and the builing up of local democratic control and ownership of the public's natural and built environment are but a few of the modules required. The greater the number of modules the greater the real savings, but the greater the demands upon the core GIS datasets and shaped viewing platforms for the GIS layers required for such a sustainable approach.

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What are Drainage Assessment Guidelines?

These were complementary to any flood risk planning constraint guidance in the Local Plan, and focussed on defining the nature and extent of measures required for any development, to reduce the risk of flooding to the development in question and to the other parts of the catchment. They would contain a mechanism for evaluating the attenuation storage needs on the development as well as highlighting the need to consider how surface water under storm conditions, flowed onto, through, and off the development. It effectively started to provide developers with information that was accumulated efficiently and at least cost by the Local Authority. The 2nd generation Drainage Assessment Guidelines are envisaged to be extended into flood risk management criteria typically found in the Local Plan, and to be extended to deal with the Construction Consent aspects traditionally done at a later stage, and to now include reference to the relevant mini-, micro-, and subcatchment boundaries, within which all the responsible authorities will define their needs and offer substantive information, leading to a reduced cost to the public and early muliple benefits.

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What does the Lowest Overall Public Cost actually mean?

It means the lowest gross direct and/or indirect overall cost to the Public. For example; if a sewerage provider had a problem area, where say there was recorded internal flooding for a storm of return period less than the trigger level for action of 1 in 10 years, they may be tempted to not formally object to a new development in the area, but may apply financial constraints related to "network reinforcement", typically once the planning process is well advanced or even completed. Should such measures follow the "end of pipe" approach on/off site, then the costs of such reinforcement would dwarf the cheapest source control approach either on the developement or elsewhere in the catchment. The public would pay via the developer for these measures in the price of the property offered, which in turn affects the prices of existing properties, which is inflationary. Should the land prices for the development impact Local Authority capital receipts then such receipts would typically have to reflect the additional "unknown/unforseen" costs raised by the sewerage provider to the developer. Whilst the house buyer gets some relief, the public then is collectively required to find other ways to fund Schools PPP etc, often very reliant upon capital receipts.

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Why is water "first amongst equals" in respect of development considerations?

Significant costs are directly atributable to water related aspects of any development, such as land take for water treatment or storage, road drainage, roof drainage etc. However all developments require water aspect interconnection in some manner or other, whether by an open watercourse, part of a SuDS treatment train, surface water overland flow path, infrastructure network reinforcement demands off site, green corridors, and flood risk. Whilst surface water sources are by definition everywhere, their confluencing into potential overland flow routes is defined topographically ie water flows along the low points. To define a development other than with clear reference to water and its natural preferences fights nature and this soon becomes more expensive both to the development and adjacent developments.

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How might a Local Area Committee (LAC) influence public engagement, and scrutinise responsible authorities' proposed measures within any Local Flood Risk Management Plan.

Traditionally Local Area Committees were very powerfull bodies inclusive of senior councillors, providing an area focused overview of matters dealt with by themed Council Boards as well as other public bodies. Clearly such a body could now provide a local area focus on the much larger Local Flood Risk Management Plan.

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